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​With Hulu Card Code to enjoy The 5 Best TV Episodes of 2017 - final

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After all, an uneven series, or one already on the wane, can still produce 22 to 60 minutes or so of extraordinary storytelling and USCardCode.com has a selection of the 5 Best TV Episodes of 2017 reflects the fundamental strength of the art form. Totally, You can use Hulu Gift Code with instant delivery service to enjoy it right now on Hulu TV.

The Good Place, “Michael’s Gambit”

The Good Place, “Michael’s Gambit”

“Michael’s Gambit,” The Good Place’s Season One finale gifts us with the twist to end all twists in 2017. The show’s premise is that the afterlife exists, allowing Eleanor (Kristen Bell), Chidi (William Jackson Harper), Tahani (Jameela Jamil) and Jason (Manny Jacinto) to wake up in The Good Place. The catch is that Eleanor and Jason actually belong in The Bad Place, leading to a season of elaborate charades and ethics lessons to keep their spots in paradise.

The Leftovers, “The Book of Nora”

The Leftovers, “The Book of Nora”

“The Book of Nora” returns us to “The Book of Kevin,” as if to bring the cosmos back into alignment. As she climbs atop the roof in search of her birds, Nora Durst (the breathtaking Carrie Coon) recalls the lonesome woman of the earlier episode, pleading with God to whisk her away: the supplicant awaiting the signal, the proof, that her experience is the truth.

Master of None, “New York, I Love You”

Master of None, “New York, I Love You”

There’s no Master of None episode quite like “New York, I Love You.” Series regulars Dev (Aziz Ansari), Arnold (Eric Wareheim) and Denise (Lena Waithe) appear in it… for about 30 seconds. After that, the episode takes a wholly unexpected detour into a triptych of slice-of-life vignettes, looking in on a doorman, a deaf woman and a cab driver for a wonderfully generous and empathic half hour. Eddie the doorman (Frank Harts), recruited to cover for a resident who’s two-timing his wife, misses his cue while helping out another resident by administering her pet bird’s medicine.

The Americans, “Darkroom”

The Americans, “Darkroom”

As with the finest entries in The Americans’ canon, then, from “Behind the Red Door,” to “The Magic of David Copperfield V: The Statue of Liberty Disappears,” “Darkroom” sutures together its disparate fragments through the elaboration of a single motif, emerging as a coded message from the far extremes of family life that nonetheless translates to our own. Rich with the raw materials of series’ greatness, the episode culminates in a stream of cuts and pans so ferocious that it highlights the terror of The Americans’ central truth: That the consequences of our lies, in love as in war, have a way of passing from generation to generation.

black-ish, “Juneteenth”

black-ish, “Juneteenth”

Kenya Barris’ sitcom has always excelled at one of the genre’s most essential functions, which is to reflect our culture, and ourselves, in something resembling real time: See last season’s “Lemons,” set in the aftermath of the presidential election, or Season Two’s “Hope,” a bottle episode that manages to unpack the fraught subject of police brutality. With “Juneteenth,” though, black-ish reaches new heights, drawing inspiration from Schoolhouse Rock and Hamilton to offer the emancipation of enslaved persons as an alternative to Columbus Day.

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